Beauty shot farm land.

Rapid Agricultural Response Fund

To find a new way to problem solve in the 21st century, in 1998 the Minnesota Legislature worked with the state's agricultural leaders to create resources to tackle emerging agrilcultural challanges. The result was the Rapid Agricultural Response Fund (RARF). Since that beginning it has helped develop research answers to some of the most puzzling and unpredictable problems facing our farmers.

Below you will find overviews of the most recent RARF projects including background information, project objectives, and progress updates when available.

Researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine were able to gather extensive samples from infected turkey farms all over the state, including samples from exhaust fans.  Their findings will help develop new protocols and programs for controlling airborne diseases in swine poultry facilities.

Roger Ruan and his team are employing an engineering approach to control airborne pathogens transmission by sanitizing the air that is circulating in or entering and leaving barns. The process will also simultaneously decompose odorous compounds and reduce odor emissions. 

Kevin Smith and his team are bringing together a unique mix of with ag researchers, ag engineers, and civil engineers in order to guide their development of a high-throughput field screening system for lodging.

Matthew Russel and his team are using remote sensing technologies to predict ash occurrence and relative abundance across Minnesota with the aim of synthesizing current management efforts in ash-dominated forests across the state. 

Dr. Torremorell and her team are continuing to work on developing and providing recommendations to producers and veterinarians to control influenza in swine herds.

Christopher Philips and his team are working to gather data on the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) and how it is affecting Minnesota apple orchards. As there is currently no data available in this area, they are focusing on providing provide knowledge that will aid in optimizing monitoring and control strategies for this invasive pest. 

Dr. Ly and his partners are working to develop and test a new vaccine for Hemorrhagic Enteritis. The new vaccine will be based on viral vaccine vector (Pichinde virus, PICV) a technology recently developed by their laboratory.

Sunil Kumar Mor and his team are studying the evolution and genomic constellations of newly re-emerging, lameness-associated turkey arthritis reoviruses (TARV) with a view to develop highly sensitive and specific diagnostic assays and to develop and evaluate safe and effective vaccines.

Anup Johny and his interdisciplinary team are building on previous research to understand the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of alternatives to antibiotic (A2A) interventions in combination against multidrug resistant (MDR) S. Heidelberg from the genomic-, microbiome and metabolome- perspectives.

Lee Johnston and his team at the West Central Research and Outreach Center are exploring ways to lower the carbon footprint of pork production by developing and evaluating innovative methods of using on-site renewable energy generation to heat piglets.

Pages