Research and Impacts

As a land-grant university, the U of M is committed to conducting research to improve Minnesota’s agricultural and forest products, horticulture, human nutrition, family and community, and environmental quality.

MAES’s multidisciplinary research explores the ecological, economic, and environmental interactions between the agriculture that feeds the world, the environment that sustains the earth, and the human interactions that support our society.

Food and Agriculture

Advancement of agricultural research was the initial call-to-action when the Hatch Act was implemented in 1887. Today, researchers continue to search for key solutions to provide safe, healthy, and economically and environmentally sustainable food sources for a growing population.

Horticulture

Research is at the heart of advancing horticulture understanding to develop new varieties and opportunities for future generations. Our researchers work on projects involving horticultural plants, fruits, vegetables, and flowers with the aim of expanding Minnesota’s horticulture industry.

Environment and Sustainability

As environmental concerns continue to create new challenges, University researchers are committed to finding solutions for everything from forest conservation to developing sustainable cropping systems to discovering alternative and renewable energy sources.

Social and Animal Welfare

As society has moved away from the rural areas and into cities, U of M researchers have been ideally placed to explore the societal, economic, and personal impacts. From affordable urban housing to food safety and animal health concerns, researchers are exploring today’s important welfare issues and discovering solutions.

George Heimpel and his team are exploring alternatives to insecticides for the control of soybean aphid--most notably biological control via parasitoid wasps. In this project they investigate, two potential limiting factors in biological control of soybean aphid – overwintering mortality and hyperparasitism with the aim of conducting experiments to reduce overwintering mortality.

William Hutchison and his team are working on developing integrated pest management systems to assist with the control of japanese beetles in the specialty crop industry. 

Anup Johny has gathered an integrated, multi-college/department team to determine the efficacy of the combination of the dairy-originated probiotic, an industry vaccine, and two essential oils, against three emerging Salmonella serovars with potential to cause foodborne outbreaks, using applied microbiology, microbiome analysis, immunology, and genomics approaches.

Jennifer Kimball and her year are evaluating five different modes of action for riceworm management at two grower locations (Gonvick, MN and Aitken, MN) during the 2019 and 2020 growing seasons. Due to the unique challenges of working in an aquatic agricultural production system, they are also planning to evaluate the feasibility of applying insecticides in the research program via drone.