Research and Impacts

As a land-grant university, the U of M is committed to conducting research to improve Minnesota’s agricultural and forest products, horticulture, human nutrition, family and community, and environmental quality.

MAES’s multidisciplinary research explores the ecological, economic, and environmental interactions between the agriculture that feeds the world, the environment that sustains the earth, and the human interactions that support our society.

Food and Agriculture

Advancement of agricultural research was the initial call-to-action when the Hatch Act was implemented in 1887. Today, researchers continue to search for key solutions to provide safe, healthy, and economically and environmentally sustainable food sources for a growing population.

Horticulture

Research is at the heart of advancing horticulture understanding to develop new varieties and opportunities for future generations. Our researchers work on projects involving horticultural plants, fruits, vegetables, and flowers with the aim of expanding Minnesota’s horticulture industry.

Environment and Sustainability

As environmental concerns continue to create new challenges, University researchers are committed to finding solutions for everything from forest conservation to developing sustainable cropping systems to discovering alternative and renewable energy sources.

Social and Animal Welfare

As society has moved away from the rural areas and into cities, U of M researchers have been ideally placed to explore the societal, economic, and personal impacts. From affordable urban housing to food safety and animal health concerns, researchers are exploring today’s important welfare issues and discovering solutions.

In an effort to identify genes with resistance to Ug99, University researchers carried out a genome-wide association study on a panel of 250 spring wheat breeding lines. #MNImpacts

Researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine were able to gather extensive samples from infected turkey farms all over the state, including samples from exhaust fans.  Their findings will help develop new protocols and programs for controlling airborne diseases in swine poultry facilities.

Roger Ruan and his team are employing an engineering approach to control airborne pathogens transmission by sanitizing the air that is circulating in or entering and leaving barns. The process will also simultaneously decompose odorous compounds and reduce odor emissions. 

Kevin Smith and his team are bringing together a unique mix of with ag researchers, ag engineers, and civil engineers in order to guide their development of a high-throughput field screening system for lodging.