Research and Impacts

As a land-grant university, the U of M is committed to conducting research to improve Minnesota’s agricultural and forest products, horticulture, human nutrition, family and community, and environmental quality.

MAES’s multidisciplinary research explores the ecological, economic, and environmental interactions between the agriculture that feeds the world, the environment that sustains the earth, and the human interactions that support our society.

Food and Agriculture

Advancement of agricultural research was the initial call-to-action when the Hatch Act was implemented in 1887. Today, researchers continue to search for key solutions to provide safe, healthy, and economically and environmentally sustainable food sources for a growing population.

Horticulture

Research is at the heart of advancing horticulture understanding to develop new varieties and opportunities for future generations. Our researchers work on projects involving horticultural plants, fruits, vegetables, and flowers with the aim of expanding Minnesota’s horticulture industry.

Environment and Sustainability

As environmental concerns continue to create new challenges, University researchers are committed to finding solutions for everything from forest conservation to developing sustainable cropping systems to discovering alternative and renewable energy sources.

Social and Animal Welfare

As society has moved away from the rural areas and into cities, U of M researchers have been ideally placed to explore the societal, economic, and personal impacts. From affordable urban housing to food safety and animal health concerns, researchers are exploring today’s important welfare issues and discovering solutions.

Minnesota has seen rapid growth in its wine industry, particularly in the past decade. To continue this growth, vineyard owners are in constant need of new and better products and varieties to boost their industry and keep wine lovers interested.

An analysis of the economic impact of the northern grape industry uncovers continued growth and opportunities.

Pandas are one of most beloved and most endangered animals on the planet but their future is far from certain. U of M researchers, using genetic analysis methods often used for livestock, analyzed wild and captive panda populations in China.

In an effort to unsure proper care of the growing elder popularion in Minnesota, UMN social scientists developed the Vital Involvement (VI) construct. They are now working closely with local organizations to ensure proper training and understanding of the VI among service providers.