Research and Impacts

As a land-grant university, the U of M is committed to conducting research to improve Minnesota’s agricultural and forest products, horticulture, human nutrition, family and community, and environmental quality.

MAES’s multidisciplinary research explores the ecological, economic, and environmental interactions between the agriculture that feeds the world, the environment that sustains the earth, and the human interactions that support our society.

Food and Agriculture

Advancement of agricultural research was the initial call-to-action when the Hatch Act was implemented in 1887. Today, researchers continue to search for key solutions to provide safe, healthy, and economically and environmentally sustainable food sources for a growing population.

Horticulture

Research is at the heart of advancing horticulture understanding to develop new varieties and opportunities for future generations. Our researchers work on projects involving horticultural plants, fruits, vegetables, and flowers with the aim of expanding Minnesota’s horticulture industry.

Environment and Sustainability

As environmental concerns continue to create new challenges, University researchers are committed to finding solutions for everything from forest conservation to developing sustainable cropping systems to discovering alternative and renewable energy sources.

Social and Animal Welfare

As society has moved away from the rural areas and into cities, U of M researchers have been ideally placed to explore the societal, economic, and personal impacts. From affordable urban housing to food safety and animal health concerns, researchers are exploring today’s important welfare issues and discovering solutions.

Research related to youth development focuses on educating and empowering today's youth.

Roger Ruan and his team have developed a Microwave-assisted pyrolysis reactor with a fixed-bed microwave susceptor silicon carbide catalyst that absorbs microwave radiation and quickly achieves a high temperature allowing rapid heating of VDBs.

Peter Larsen and his interdisciplinary team have reached a new milestone in their goal to develop a robust next-generation antemortem test for the rapid detection of Chronic wasting disease. 

Howard Hoganson and his research team have led detailed analyses to support the current forest plans for both the Chippewa and Superior National Forests in Minnesota, expanding modeling methods spatially to recognize important site-level conditions important for wildlife, while also still addressing the economics of timber production--including aspen.