Research and Impacts

As a land-grant university, the U of M is committed to conducting research to improve Minnesota’s agricultural and forest products, horticulture, human nutrition, family and community, and environmental quality.

MAES’s multidisciplinary research explores the ecological, economic, and environmental interactions between the agriculture that feeds the world, the environment that sustains the earth, and the human interactions that support our society.

Food and Agriculture

Advancement of agricultural research was the initial call-to-action when the Hatch Act was implemented in 1887. Today, researchers continue to search for key solutions to provide safe, healthy, and economically and environmentally sustainable food sources for a growing population.

Horticulture

Research is at the heart of advancing horticulture understanding to develop new varieties and opportunities for future generations. Our researchers work on projects involving horticultural plants, fruits, vegetables, and flowers with the aim of expanding Minnesota’s horticulture industry.

Environment and Sustainability

As environmental concerns continue to create new challenges, University researchers are committed to finding solutions for everything from forest conservation to developing sustainable cropping systems to discovering alternative and renewable energy sources.

Social and Animal Welfare

As society has moved away from the rural areas and into cities, U of M researchers have been ideally placed to explore the societal, economic, and personal impacts. From affordable urban housing to food safety and animal health concerns, researchers are exploring today’s important welfare issues and discovering solutions.

Palmer amaranth was first detected in Minnesota in 2016, but even before it hit the state, University of Minnesota researchers and Extension specialists mobilized to help state agencies and landowners develop a plan to eradicate infestations before spread to new areas.

University researchers in the College of Veterinary Medicine Center for Animal Health and Food Safety (CAHFS) have been key partners in helping to track African Swine Fever. In 2019,  they partnered with a team of researchers around the world to measure the risk of ASF entering the U.S. through the smuggling of pork products in air passenger luggage. 

Eastern larch beetles are not new and, in fact, are native to Minnesota. They are found everywhere tamaracks grow, but throughout history, the beetles never posed a great threat and were largely ignored by forest entomologists. What has changed?

CFANS and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute have teamed up to drive the development of a next-generation agroinformatics data discovery, sharing and analytics platform dubbed GEMSTM