Social and Animal Welfare

Social and Animal Welfare Features and Impacts

University of Minnesota researchers and industry partners showcased their latest innovations and research findings during the Midwest Farm Energy Conference at the University of Minnesota's West Central Research and Outreach Center (WCROC) June 13 in Morris, MN.

Extreme poverty and the loss of traditional foods have caused many Native Americans to suffer from poor or inadequate diets. This has led to increased obesity, diabetes, and other profound health problems on a large scale.

Researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine were able to gather extensive samples from infected turkey farms all over the state, including samples from exhaust fans.  Their findings will help develop new protocols and programs for controlling airborne diseases in swine poultry facilities.

Roger Ruan and his team are employing an engineering approach to control airborne pathogens transmission by sanitizing the air that is circulating in or entering and leaving barns. The process will also simultaneously decompose odorous compounds and reduce odor emissions. 

Dr. Torremorell and her team are continuing to work on developing and providing recommendations to producers and veterinarians to control influenza in swine herds.

Dr. Ly and his partners are working to develop and test a new vaccine for Hemorrhagic Enteritis. The new vaccine will be based on viral vaccine vector (Pichinde virus, PICV) a technology recently developed by their laboratory.

Sunil Kumar Mor and his team are studying the evolution and genomic constellations of newly re-emerging, lameness-associated turkey arthritis reoviruses (TARV) with a view to develop highly sensitive and specific diagnostic assays and to develop and evaluate safe and effective vaccines.

Anup Johny and his interdisciplinary team are building on previous research to understand the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of alternatives to antibiotic (A2A) interventions in combination against multidrug resistant (MDR) S. Heidelberg from the genomic-, microbiome and metabolome- perspectives.

Lee Johnston and his team at the West Central Research and Outreach Center are exploring ways to lower the carbon footprint of pork production by developing and evaluating innovative methods of using on-site renewable energy generation to heat piglets.

Timothy Johnson and his team are working to develop a tool called Minnesota Poultry Pathogen Population Analysis (MnPoPPA) for the assessment of pathogen ecology by poultry producers in Minnesota. They also plan to design modeling approaches that can be used to predict pathogen population shifts following implementation of a vaccine within a poultry producing system.

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