Baby's arm being held in large hand.

Social and Animal Welfare

Land-grant colleges, such as the University of Minnesota, have a research mission to promote animal, human, and environmental health. By providing research funding to multiple colleges throughout the University, MAES funds research in both animal and social sciences. Significantly, the University's unique urban location allows for research studies that would be impossible for many other land-grant institutions.

For information on the latest social and animal welfare research please visit the features and impacts page.

Veterinary Medicine and Animal Welfare

Often Vet Med and Animal Science researchers work in hand-in-hand to protect consumers, producers, and agriculture animals. From researching emerging farm animal diseases to developing treatments for family pets, University scientists are on the cutting edge of veterinary and animal welfare issues.

Housing and Family Life

The U of M’s unique metropolitan location makes it an ideal place to study urban and affordable housing. Social science researchers are taking a close look at families and how everything from finances to divorce affects today's family unit.

Education and Healthy Living

From food safety and childhood obesity to economic education and the STEM Education Center, University researchers are committed to educating people throughout the world on how to live healthier, happier lives.

A collaborative research project has led to the creation of the Culturally Enriched Communities website, which fuses interdisciplinary research findings with design-related best practices that can be used to eliminate health, income and educational racial disparities and strengthen the economic and cultural vitality of neighborhoods, cities, regions and states.

University researchers in the College of Veterinary Medicine Center for Animal Health and Food Safety (CAHFS) have been key partners in helping to track African Swine Fever. In 2019,  they partnered with a team of researchers around the world to measure the risk of ASF entering the U.S. through the smuggling of pork products in air passenger luggage. 

In response to the 2013 and 2014 wheat stem rust epidemics in Ethiopia, a collaborative research and education team formed to study the biology and control of new, dangerous forms of the wheat stem rust pathogen from East Africa and other parts of the world and to provide Ethiopian scientists and farmers with the tools and knowledge needed to combat wheat stem rust.