Horticultural Features and Impacts

Growing North Minneapolis is a community-driven program which aims to build food, environmental, social and cognitive justice through sustainable urban growing and greening. Learning and career development are experiential and contextualized in real-world experiences related to the FEW nexus. Urban youth, predominantly of color and low socioeconomic status, are hired through a local workforce development program, and work together with UMN undergraduates and North Minneapolis community mentors to form intergenerational communities of practice.

With the ultimate goal of developing more sustainable food production systems, UMN researchers explored plant-soil-microbe relationships driving soil fertility in organic systems. To do this, they developed a farmer-driven project to investigate the role summer cover crops can play in enhancement of soil nutrients and overall health when grown for short periods of time. Significantly, they partnered with a variety of immigrant farmer grower groups for on-farm studies and shared their soil health information directly with producers.

Colony collapse disorder (CDD) is a threat to the survival of honey bees and could significantly disrupt agricultural production.  However, research into CCD is limited by the lack of in vitro cultures composed of honey bee cells. To address this limitation, UMN researchers at the Bee Lab and the Department of Entomology set out to develop a honey bee cell line that would support continuous culturing of the insect cells in order to develop a powerful tool to explore the process of infection and the negative impact pathogens may have on honey bee biology and health.

Since 1975, David Hansen has documented thousands of research projects and their footprint on everyday life for the University of Minnesota. Now retired, his photo collection has been added to UMedia fulfilling a long-term goal to have his photos freely accessible to the University and public to enjoy for decades to come.

By providing the industry with the latest advances in propagation, hybridization, cultivation and winemaking, U of M researchers and extension specialists are ensuring the introduction of vines with superior performance in both vineyard and winery and helping guarantee the continued growth of the wine industry throughout MN and the world.

Experts on turf, pollinators and urban landscapes teamed up to explore if flowering bee lawns are a good way for public land managers and homeowners to support bees.  

Ibrahim Volkan Isler and his team are developing technology that focuses on two tasks: counting apples in an orchard and measuring their diameter. New technologies like these present an important opportunity for speciality crop growers.

Neil Anderson and his team have continued the University's long-term mum breeding program while leading it in new directions. Their innovations and partnerships have had a profound affect on the floral industry in the U.S. and throughout the world.

MAES supports horticultural research for fruit, vegetables, and ornamental plants and turfgrasses. Research in these areas includes breeding new plant and crop varieties, exploring new management practices and technologies and studying pests and disease affecting the horticultural industry. Here we provide an overview of research highlights from fiscal year 2018. 

Jim Luby and his team have changed apple industry through the introduction of new apple varieties with unique textures and amazing flavor!  From Honeycrisp to Rave/First Kiss their creations have revived the apple industry in Minnesota and beyond. 

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