Horticultural Features and Impacts

Ibrahim Volkan Isler and his team are developing technology that focuses on two tasks: counting apples in an orchard and measuring their diameter. New technologies like these present an important opportunity for speciality crop growers.

Neil Anderson and his team have continued the University's long-term mum breeding program while leading it in new directions. Their innovations and partnerships have had a profound affect on the floral industry in the U.S. and throughout the world.

MAES supports horticultural research for fruit, vegetables, and ornamental plants and turfgrasses. Research in these areas includes breeding new plant and crop varieties, exploring new management practices and technologies and studying pests and disease affecting the horticultural industry. Here we provide an overview of research highlights from fiscal year 2018. 

Jim Luby and his team have changed apple industry through the introduction of new apple varieties with unique textures and amazing flavor!  From Honeycrisp to Rave/First Kiss their creations have revived the apple industry in Minnesota and beyond. 

University researchers are committed to uncovering new information and developing conservation plans to assist with adaptation strategies. Here we provide an overview of research highlights from fiscal year 2018. 

William Hutchison and his team are working on developing integrated pest management systems to assist with the control of japanese beetles in the specialty crop industry. 

Matt Clark and his team conducting research on an emerging global problem called Grapevine Trunk Disease with the aim of identifying the pathogens, determining their impact, biology and ecology and developing necessary management recommendations for vineyards.

Since its arrival in 2012, the spotted wing drosophila (SWD) has been one of the most damaging invasive species in Minnesota agriculture. Bill Hutchison and his team are exploring several management practices to help Minnesota small fruit growers deal with this devastating threat.

Honey bees play a keystone role in the productivity of agriculture and the beauty of our world by pollinating fruits, vegetables, nuts and flowers. Recently, Marla Spivak and her team have been exploring how honey bees keep themselves healthy through social immunity - including propolis envelopes.

Dutch elm disease (DED) remains the most devastating invasive tree disease to affect Minnesota. Despite extensive research on DED, it remains unclear what mechanisms allow certain elms to be resistant while others are susceptible.

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