Food and Agriculture Features and Impacts

Minnesota has seen rapid growth in its wine industry, particularly in the past decade. To continue this growth, vineyard owners are in constant need of new and better products and varieties to boost their industry and keep wine lovers interested.

An analysis of the economic impact of the northern grape industry uncovers continued growth and opportunities.

Insect pollinators provide essential services to growers of US fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds and honeybees are their star performer accounting for over two-thirds of the agricultural output attributed to insect pollination. Research projects and extension programs are uncovering new information to help Minnesotans protect this essential insect.

U of M researchers are developing new diagnostic tools to detect microbial food spoilage that are rapid, sensitive, specific and cost-effective for the food industry to adopt.

U of M researchers and Extension educators are working closely with MN growers to provide information on best practicies for alternative cropping systems. 

University of Minnesota researchers and industry partners showcased their latest innovations and research findings during the Midwest Farm Energy Conference at the University of Minnesota's West Central Research and Outreach Center (WCROC) June 13 in Morris, MN.

As the first widely available perennial grain crop, intermediate wheatgrass will change agriculture landscapes by providing multiple ecosystem services including making them more sustainable, especially in the face of climate change. But more work is needed to breed new varieties of intermediate wheatgrass that will be profitable for farmers and fulfill industry needs.

Extreme poverty and the loss of traditional foods have caused many Native Americans to suffer from poor or inadequate diets. This has led to increased obesity, diabetes, and other profound health problems on a large scale.

The amount, orientation, and effectiveness of investments in research and development (R&D) shape our technological futures, but the processes play out over long-periods of time and require long-run perspective that takes into account all-dimensions of food and agriculture productivity.

The University of Minnesota has released a new hard red spring wheat variety called ‘Lang-MN.’ It is a well-balanced, high yielding spring wheat variety well suited for much of the spring wheat-growing region. Lang-MN is named after Ben Lang, past president of the Minnesota Crop Improvement Association (MCIA).  

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